Re-using Hardboiled Easter Egg Shells For Wild Birds

Easter Eggs Re using Hardboiled Easter Egg Shells For Wild Birds

Photo Courtesy of: jakeprzespo

Hardboiled eggs are making their seasonal comeback as snacks, decorations, and salad fixins at the same time that their crushed shells can benefit the local songbird population the most.

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Get 10% Off Your Next Big Lowe’s Purchase

LowesLBSTlogo432x239 Get 10% Off Your Next Big Lowe’s Purchase

Need a new appliance?   Have big plans for your yard this season?   Fred and Ethan over at One Project Closer.com have rounded up a few Lowe’s coupons for your Spring 2010 projects!  Follow the link above and check out the new coupons.



Snow Melt Products That Will Prolong The Life of Your Sidewalks

leaves on sidewalk 1024x681 Snow Melt Products That Will Prolong The Life of Your Sidewalks

Photo courtesy of: eddie.welker

Rock salt is no friend to cement sidewalks.  While it works wonders on asphalt surfaces, on concrete it will eat through your sidewalks in record time causing pitting and flaking.  Pitted concrete erodes and dissolves over the course of a few years, leaving a rapidly deteriorating surface for foot traffic. Unlike asphalt, which can simply be re-surfaced after cracks and chips, damaged cement needs to be removed for new cement to be poured, and that is one expense you can forgo with a little winter planning.

Whether using in large scale property management scenarios, or in smaller quantities around a home, it is important to find a good product that will prevent re-freezing, without eating away at the sidewalk itself. [Read more...]

What A Difference Three Weeks Makes

This is one of my Bluebird boxes in February

Blizzard Birdhouse What A Difference Three Weeks Makes

This is the same Bluebird box in early March

IMG 2407 1024x790 What A Difference Three Weeks Makes

We missed you Spring.  I’m glad you’re back!

My El-Cheapo Easter Update

I’m a bit spartan in my decorating habits, and the number of knick-knacks I allow to lie around the house.  Most of the time I rarely notice the lack of photo’s, paintings, and decor, preferring to point my furniture toward the windows and enjoy the view of my roses and suet feeders.  Winter’s lack of daylight encouraged me to install these shelves two years ago over my television (situated between two windows as well), and this spring I decided the all-season display I lay across them through most of the year was looking a little too boring for the amount of time I spend looking up at it.

Being in a rather thrifty state of mind, here’s what I whipped up to celebrate the spring season, with finds that were all under three dollars! [Read more...]

Fruits And Veggies You Can Safely Plant In Your Yard In Early Spring

Rhubarb Fruits And Veggies You Can Safely Plant In Your Yard In Early Spring3712121307 4907200bec m 150x150 Fruits And Veggies You Can Safely Plant In Your Yard In Early SpringAsparagus 150x150 Fruits And Veggies You Can Safely Plant In Your Yard In Early SpringStrawberry 150x150 Fruits And Veggies You Can Safely Plant In Your Yard In Early Spring

A little cold weather won’t bother these toughies!  To get  jump start on your fruit and vegetable garden move young or indoor grown seedlings of Rhubarb, Blackberry, Asparagus, and Strawberry plants outside in March.   These plants can thrive outdoors in the fickle temperatures of early Spring, and be ready for harvest quickly.

Quick Tips:

  • Rhubarb grown in colder climates will be harvest ready in April or May, or in the Fall if planted later.  When grown in the southern areas of the USA or in the Southern Hemisphere it can be grown year round for pies and jellies.
  • Blackberries, and Strawberries will be harvest ready in the June through October window with regular picking.  As with most berries, picking off a few fruits or flower buds before maturation will reduce the competition between the ovaries, and provide you with fewer, but much larger fruit.
  • Asparagus doesn’t take up much room during the planting and harvesting stage, but from mid to late summer when it needs to be allowed to fill out and produce berries, it can be a total garden hog!  Make sure to plant this delicious beast somewhere where its loose fern shape won’t offend your garden scheme, or impede pathways.  Garden centers advise that a three year old plant is the most reliable producer, so don’t  plan on instant gratification with this favorite gourmet veggie.  For long term success, it’s best to leave the plant alone for a few years to allow it to really take to root in your veggie patch.
Photo’s Courtesy of:  cygnus921, Rob Ireton, ^riza^